Autumn 2018 | Winter 2019 | Spring 2019

 

Autumn 2018

20010.  Anthropology of the Future. (PQ This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology" selection for Anthropology Majors.)  Two major subfields of anthropology – archaeology and ethnography – have traditionally been oriented around the human past and the human present. But what about the future? Conceptions of the future and future-oriented behavior have long been understood to be a critical plane of difference between political economies, religions, and cultural groups, yet they have rarely been an explicit focus of study. When we shift the temporal frame to the future, questions that arise include: do all cultures have theories of the future? how much about human societies are intentional? how does ideology shape future possibilities? what role do imagined futures play in political life? We will consider theories of temporality, past futures (Aztec, Polynesian, Italian), and movements such as millenarianism, messianic religions, Marxism, Dadaism, utopian communities, Afro-futurism, transhumanism, and today’s neo-futurist movements that deploy radical technology and speculative design in response to looming climate change. We will also explore the intimate relationship between speculative fiction (e.g., Ursula K. LeGuin, Kurt Vonnegut) and anthropology. Shannon Dawdy

ANTH 20011. Peasants: Anthropology, Rural Life, Capitalism. (This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology Majors.) Only a few short decades ago, rural societies were at the center of anthropological inquiry and key sources of ethnographic insight. Today, anthropological attentions have redirected toward cityscapes and urban experiences, leading a recent review piece to wonder: “Where have all the peasants gone?” The answer, of course, is nowhere. Peasants may have slipped by the wayside of analysis, but nearly half of the world’s population today remains rural, and more than ever, countrysides are acutely affected by the economic transformations reshaping our world and the uncertainties facing our future: the challenges of food security, sustainable living, (agricultural) biotechnology, ecological precariousness, global poverty, and escalating rates of urbanization and urban migration. In a decidedly non-trendy move, then, this course will take the anthropology of peasantry as its focus, and will make the case that small-scale farming communities remain highly relevant sites for diagnosing capitalism’s changing conditions and its lived consequences. Our discussions will be at once historical, conceptual, and ethnographic, and will draw on a broad set of case-studies around the globe. We will review classic debates about peasantries in relation to the history of capitalism, and reflect on the analytical possibilities and limitations of the peasant concept. We will read classic ethnographic studies, and map, along with more contemporary analysis, how rural labor, livelihoods, hopes, and subjectivities have been reconfigured over the past 60 years, and what new prospects await. François Richard

20701-20702-03 Introduction to African Civilization I, II.(=10101-10102-10103, CRES 20701-20808-20303; ) Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Part Oneof the African Civilization takes a historical approach. We consider how different types of historical evidence – documentary, oral, and material – can be used to investigate processes of change and transformation in Africa from the early iron age through the emergence of the Atlantic World in the fifteenth century.  We will investigate state-formation in comparative perspective and examine case studies from the Swahili Coast, the empires of Ghana and Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also treats the diffusion of Islam, European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Emily Osborn

21201. Chicago Blues (=CRES 21201). This course is an anthropological and historical exploration of one of the most original and influential American musical genres in its social and cultural context.  The course traces the origins of the “Delta Blues” in the culture of African American sharecroppers of rural Mississippi, its transposition to Chicago during the “great migration” of the first half of the twentieth century, its development (in the bars and streets of Chicago’s Southside and Westside) into the tough, aggressive urban music that has come to be known as “Chicago Blues”, and its eventual spread to audiences outside the African American community.  The course examines transformations in the cultural meaning of the blues and its place within broader American cultural currents, the social and economic situation of blues musicians, and the political economy of blues within the wider music industry.  Michael Dietler.

ANTH 21344. The Meaning of Police. The purpose of this class is to offer students an intellectual toolkit for thinking critically and engaging politically with contemporary problems of police. It will introduce classical as well as emerging themes, drawing on research from diverse social and geographical locations. We will discuss, among other things, the paradox of legal lawlessness, the relationship between law and the body, and the unstable distinction between public and private violence. Paying attention to classed, sexed, and racialized notions of danger and threat, we will discuss the historical fabrication of criminality as well as the complex legacies of security and protection that underpin practices of criminal punishment. While subjecting policing to an anthropological interrogation—asking what police means for different people in different times and places—we will also consider the uneasy affinity between policemen and ethnographers in order to ask what it can teach us about police, and how it might illuminate our understanding of ethnography.  Eilat Maoz

ANTH 21406/38300. Celebrity and Science in Paleoanthropology (=HIPS 21100). A seminar to explore the balance among research, show biz, big business, and politics in the careers of Louis, Mary, and Richard Leakey; Alan Walker; Donald Johanson; Jane Goodall; Dian Fossey; and Biruté Galdikas through films, taped interviews, autobiogra­phies, biographies, pop publications, instructor's anecdotes, and samples of their scientific writings. Russell Tuttle.

ANTH 23101. Introduction to Latin American Civilization-1 (=LACS 16100/34600, HIST 16101/36101, SOSC 26100, CRES 16101). Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.   MonWedFri 1:30-2:20

ANTH 23027/32330. Toxic States: Corrupted Ecologies in Latin America and the Caribbean (=LACS 26417/36417). Concepts of purity and danger, the sacred and profane, and contamination and healing constitute central analytics of anthropological inquiry into religion, medicine, and ecology. This course brings diverse theories of corporeal corruption to bear on contemporary ethnography of toxicity, particularly in order to examine the impact of political corruption on ecological matters in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will both historicize a growing disciplinary preoccupation with materiality, contamination, and the chemical, as well as conceptualize its empirical significance within neo-colonial/liberal states throughout the region. Stefanie Graeter.

24001-24002-24001. Colonizations I, II, III (=CRPC 24001-24002-24003, HIST 18301-18302-18203, SOSC 24001-24002-24003).  PQ: These course must be taken in Sequence.  This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.  This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange.  We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.  Themes of slavery, colonization and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.  Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.  The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers. 

24320/35115. Cultural Psychology: Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations (=CHDV 21000/31000, GNSE 21001/31000, PSYC 23000/33000, AMER 33000). There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world. Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning. Richard Shweder.

24510/34501. Anthropology of Museums (=MAPS 34500, MAPS 34400). Using anthropological theories and methodology as a conceptual framework, this seminar will explore the organizational and ideological aspects of museum culture(s). The course includes visits to museums with guest museum professionals as guides into the culture of museums. Morris Fred

25119. The End Tales: Recounting, Retrieving the Altering Worlds (=GLST 27704). The class seeks to explore diverse modes of recounting contemporary more-than-human worlds in the face of the dire future of the planet. Working under the rubrics of "environmental tragedy" (Foster 2015), Anthropocene (Nimmo 2015), the "catastrophic times," (Stengers 2015), and the "death of a civilization" (Dibley 2015), thinkers across the humanities and social sciences are honing conceptual resources for comprehending and communicating the consequences of the global political economy and lifestyle that destabilizes the biosphere, endangers wildlife, and fails to instill genuine changes in the face of the "dangerous, unpredictable, and potentially catastrophic climate change" (Foster 2015). The class joins the cause but shifts attention to the empirical materials that insistently thread together the ecological with cosmological, practical with eschatological and metaphysical concerns. How can scholars listen to these overtones with a fresh attention? Could we repurpose them responsibly and productively The class seeks to explore diverse modes of recounting contemporary more-than-human worlds in the face of the dire future of the planet. Working under the rubrics of "environmental tragedy" (Foster 2015), Anthropocene (Nimmo 2015), the "catastrophic times," (Stengers 2015), and the "death of a civilization" (Dibley 2015), thinkers across the humanities and social sciences are honing conceptual resources for comprehending and communicating the consequences of the global political economy and lifestyle that destabilizes the biosphere, endangers wildlife, and fails to instill genuine changes in the face of the "dangerous, unpredictable, and potentially catastrophic climate change" (Foster 2015). The class joins the cause but shifts attention to the empirical materials that insistently thread together the ecological with cosmological, practical with eschatological and metaphysical concerns. How can scholars listen to these overtones with a fresh attention? Could we repurpose them responsibly and productively for the task of telling and teaching about the present and contemplating the future? The class endeavors to find room for the vernacular and textual reservoirs of compelling storytelling about metaphysical meaning and cosmological relations that make-up and ruin the Earth that might be otherwise (dis)missed. Larisa Jasarevic

26710/36710. Ancient Landscapes-1 (=NEAA 20061/30061, GEOG 25400/35400). This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student. Anthony Lauricella

28110.  Human Origins: Milestone in Human Evolution and the Fossil Record (= BIOS 22265). This course aims at exploring the fundamentals of human origins by tracking the major events during the course of human evolution. Starting with a laboratory based general introduction to human osteology and muscle function, the latest on morphological and behavioral evidence for what makes Homo sapiens and their fossil ancestors unique among primates will be presented. Our knowledge of the last common ancestor will be explored using the late Miocene fossil record followed by a series of lectures on comparative and functional morphology, adaptation and biogeography of fossil human species. With focus on the human fossil record, the emergence of bipedalism, advent of stone tool use and making, abandonment of arboreality, advent of endurance walking and running, dawn of encephalization and associated novel life histories, language and symbolism will be explored. While taxonomic identities and phylogenetic relationships will be briefly presented, the focus will be on investigating major adaptive transitions and how that understanding helps us to unravel the ecological selective factors that ultimately led to the emergence of our species. The course will be supported by fresh data coming from active field research conducted by Prof. Alemseged and state of the art visualization methods that help explore internal structures. By tracing the path followed by our ancestors over time, this course is directly relevant to reconnoitering the human condition today and our place in nature. Zeresenay Alemseged

29700. Readings in Anthropology. PQ: Consent of instructor and program chairman. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. At the discretion of the instructor, this course is available for either Pass or letter grading. Staff. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. Preparation of Bachelor's Essay. PQ: Consent of instructor and program chairman. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. At the discretion of the instructor, this course is available for either Pass or letter grading. For honors requirements, consult the honors section under Program Requirements. Staff. Autumn, Winter, Spring.


Winter 2019

20003. Reading Race.  (PQ This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology" selection for Anthropology Majors.) Before and since Anthropology became a discrete scientific field of study, questions about the biological reality, potential utility and misuse of the concept of race in Homo sapiens have been debated.  We will read and discuss a sample of writings by 18th, 19th, and 20th century and contemporary authors who attempted to define human races and those who have promoted or contemporary authors who attempted to define human races and those who have promoted or debunked the utility of the concept of race with special attention to it role in retarding social progress, and the extermination and exploitation of some populations and individuals.  Russell Tuttle

20701-20702-20703. Introduction to African Civilization I, II.(= HIST 10101-10102-10103, CRES 20701-20802-20303; CHDV 21401 SOSC 22500-22600) Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Part Two of African Civilization introduces students to the anthropological study of African societies, with a particular focus on African modernity. Some of the themes that we address include: the colonial encounter and the way it transformed everyday life; nationalism and gender; ethnicity, and the politics of development.  Case studies will be drawn primarily from countries in Eastern and Southern Africa including Kenya, Zimbabwe, Zambia, South Africa and Madagascar.Jennifer Cole

21107/30000. Anthropological Theory. Since its inception as an academically institutionalized discipline, anthropology has always addressed the relation between a self-consciously modernizing “West” and its various and changing “others.” Yet it has not always done so with sufficient critical attention to its own concepts and categories – a fact that has led, since at least the 1980s, to considerable debate about the nature of the anthropological enterprise and its forms of knowledge. This course provides a brief critical introduction to the history of anthropological thought over the course of the discipline’s “long” twentieth century, from the 1880s to the present. Although it centers on the North American and British traditions, we will also review important strains of French social theory in chronicling the emergence and transformation of “modern” anthropology as an empirically based, but theoretically informed practice of knowledge production about human sociality and culture. Stephan Palmié

21303.  Making the Natural World: Foundations of Human Ecology (=ENST 21301)Required of all ENST majors.  In this course we consider the conceptual underpinnings of contemporary Western notions of ecology, environment, and balance, and also examine several specific historical trajectories of anthropogenic landscape change.  We approach these issues from the vantage of several different disciplinary traditions including environmental history, philosophy, ecological anthropology, and paleoecology. 

21343. Anthropology and/of Tourism: Of Otherness and Encounters (=CRES 21343). Travelling  as a mode of self-cultivation and world awareness has always captivated our imagination. With increasing ease of travel, tourism is a $ 2.3 trillion industry, with 1.25 billion annual travelers. How does reading ethnographies of tourism help us examine encounters with others as anthropology’s central prerogative? From Emerson’s quote – is the meaning of an encounter located within us or in the object? Is otherness some inherent quality or a product of specific narratives and practices? Encountering otherness being anthropology’s primary research methodology, can ethnographers be compared to tourists? How is the discipline itself implicated in unequal power relations of cultural encounters? We will read ethnographies covering a range of concerns about tourism – its linkages with colonialism/neo-colonialism, its role in stereotyping indigenous cultures, its impact on the environment, on gender dynamics, on representations of nationhood and on cultivation of bourgeois selfhood. Our aim is to use anthropological insights to appraise the phenomenon of tourism as a whole, identifying its pros and cons; and to also flip this perspective to ask: what insights does tourism give us into encounters and othering as foundational concerns of anthropology? Suchismita Das

21431. Counting, Calculation and Computation: Anthropologies of Number. This seminar introduces undergraduates to anthropologies of counting, calculation and computation. The course is split into two parts. In part one (Weeks 1-3), we will explore anthropological and historical approaches to number, mathematics and calculation per se, with the goal of developing an analytical toolset through which we can approach the categories “counting” and “number” more critically and creatively. In part two (Weeks 4-10), we expand on this toolset ethnographically, moving through a series of cases to examine how number, counting and calculation are situated variously in contemporary social life, with powerful ethical, political and even biological effects. We will move through themes including war and genocide, health and the body, human-machine interfaces, “state science”, environmental metrics, and software algorithms and “big data”. The ultimate objective will be to train students to identify and interrogate some of the myriad ways that number is always-already situated in social life – not coming objectively “from nowhere”. At the same time, we will try to firmly root our project in an anthropology of number per se, approaching our ethnographic selections from a footing slightly outside of STS or familiar humanist critiques of statistics. Together, we will test whether this footing leads us somewhere new. Jack Mullee

21730. Science, Technology and Media via Japan. (PQ This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology Majors.) This course will explore issues of culture, technology, and environment in Japan through the lens of Science and Technology Studies (STS) and Media Studies. The course is designed for undergraduate students. Its overall aim is to introduce students to some of the fundamental concepts, themes, and problematics in these fields via the particular social and historical circumstances in Japan. Some of the central concerns will be around issues of environment, disaster, gender, labor, media theory, gaming, and animation. In addition, we will devote attention to the recent emergence of the term media ecology as a framework problematizing technologically engineered environments. Michael Fisch

22710/41810. Signs and the State. Science and Technology Studies have led us to new questions about knowledge and power.  This course reconsiders the history of semiotic technologies, from Sanskrit to iphones, with special attention to changing conditions of possibility for the state.  Which semiotic technologies enable new kinds of state institutions (such as Althusser’s “ideological state apparatuses,” or, Weber’s “legal/rational order”) and which can undermine state monopolies and hegemonies?  While a primary goal of the course is quest for perspective on the implications of the internet for potentialities of sovereign power, the course does not limit itself to recent developments.  We consider the implications of advancing printing technologies for renaissance, enlightenment and liberal revolution in 15th-19th century Europe (especially by way of Bakhtin, Febvre and Martin, and Darnton) and also, we consider relations of changing semiotic technologies to changing early historic states before print and capitalism, comparing the graphic formalization of literary Sinitic, the shi, the archive and the (strong) state in China to the grammars for Sanskrit, the brahmins, monasteries, and the (weak) state in South Asia.  Following Weber to study means and forces of coercion and of communication as well as means and forces of production, this course is intended to complement study of “language ideology” and to pose new questions about the politics of sign circulation.  Further readings include Latour, Lessig and Patanjali. John Kelly

23093 Latin American Extractivisms (=LACS 26416, PBPL 26416, GNSE 26414). This course will survey the historical antecedents and contemporary politics of Latin American extractivisms. While resource extraction in Latin America is far from new, the scale and transnational scope of current "neoextractivisms" have unearthed unprecedented rates of profit as well as social conflict. Today's oil wells, open-pit mines, and vast fields of industrial agriculture have generated previously unthinkable transformations to local ecologies and social life, while repeating histories of indigenous land dispossession in the present. Yet parallel to neo-extractive regimes, emergent Latin American social movements have unleashed impassioned and often unexpected forms of local and transnational resistance. Readings in the course will contrast cross-regional trends of extractive economic development and governance with fine-grained accounts of how individuals, families, and communities experience and respond to land dispossession, local and transregional conflict, and the ecological and health impacts of Latin American extractivisms. Stephanie Graeter.

23096.  Development and the Right to Housing in Latin America: A Critical Appraisal (=LACS 26622). Bringing a wide variety of disciplinary texts into conversation, this course leads towards a holistic understanding of the historically rooted and globally entangled housing condition of Latin America’s urban poor. It encourages students to read along the grain of developmental discourse at different stages of twentieth-century development, thus advancing students’ capacity to critically situate and condition global and national policies. The course analytically foregrounds problems of governance, resource distribution, and sociopolitical complexity, providing students with a representative range of case studies from across the subcontinent and interrogating what it means for social and economic goods to be labeled human rights. Throughout the course, students will examine divergent housing arrangements and policies in the context of national, regional, and global development histories. Ultimately, the course will advance comprehension of the particularities of contemporary Latin American societies, and that which they share with the Global South and the world at large.  Ines Escobar Gonzalez.

23101-23102-23103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I, II, III. (=HIST 16101-16102-16103, LTAM 16100-16200-16300, LCAS 34600-34700-34800, SOSC 26100-26200-26300) PQ: May be taken in sequence or individually. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central America, South America, Caribbean Islands).  Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.  Winter 2018 Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century. Spring 2018focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.  Winter: Dain Borges.

23607. The Immigrant as American Prototype (=CRES 23607). This undergraduate seminar explores how the figure of “the immigrant” has come to mediate various origin myths and anticipatory imaginations of “Americanness” in contemporary political struggles.  A central proposition of the course is that “the immigrant” should be seen NOT as an “original” founding subject of the United States and its “American Dream” but rather, as a modern prototype—forged only since the late 19th century—for stress-testing different models of American presence and power in the world.  Importantly, this is a world increasingly ordered, as well as destabilized, by the expanding logics of industrial and corporate capital—a historical development with reverberating effects into our contemporary debates over the relation of “the immigrant” to American “values” and global “competitiveness.”  Drawing on various historical, anthropological and audiovisual resources, this seminar aims to situate the emergence of “the immigrant” as American prototype in relation to (1) earlier cultural-historical archetypes of mass migration, such as “the settler” and “the emigrant” and (2) current debates over nativist and cosmopolitan models of American security-cum-prosperity that take “the immigrant” as the limit case for evaluating “the human,” “the normal,” and “the good life” across nationalist and globalizing space-times.  Besides conventional reading and writing assignments, this seminar will offer students the opportunity to experiment with multimedia methods for ethnographic research through a final web-based project in which students will draw from current news and popular media sources to assemble and critically present on their own version of “the Immigrant” as American prototype. Julie Chu,

23911 Anthropology of Religion (=RLST 27650).  This course explores classic theories and methods in the anthropology of religion. We will cover core themes that have defined the field such as ethics, epistemology, language and political economy. Angie Heo.

24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I, II, III (=SOSC 24002-24002-24003, CRPC 24001-24002-24003; HIST 18301-18302-18303) Must be taken in sequence.  This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.  This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange.  We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.  Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.  Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.  The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers. 

24307/34307. Lab, Field, and Clinic: History and Anthropology of Medicine and the Life Sciences (=HIST 25808/35808, KNOW 25308/40202, HIPS 25808/CHSS 35308).  In this course we will examine the ways in which different groups of people--in different times and places--have understood the nature of life and living things, bodies and bodily processes, and health and disease, among other notions. We will address these issues principally, though not exclusively, through the lens of the changing sets of methods and practices commonly recognizable as science and medicine. We will also pay close attention to the methods through which scholars in history and anthropology have written about these topics, and how current scientific and medical practices affect historical and anthropological studies of science and medicine. Michael Rossi

24330/40330.  Medical Anthropology (=CHDV 23204/43204).This course introduces students to the central concepts and methods of medical anthropology. Drawing on a number of classic and contemporary texts, we will consider both the specificity of local medical cultures and the processes that increasingly link these systems of knowledge and practice. We will study the social and political economic shaping of illness and suffering, and will examine medical and healing systems—including biomedicine—as social institutions and as sources of epistemological authority. Topics covered will include the problem of belief, local theories of disease causation and healing efficacy, the placebo effect and contextual healing, theories of embodiment, medicalization, structural violence, modernity and the distribution of risk, the meanings and effects of new medical technologies, and global health.  Eugene Raikhel.

25118. Earthbound Metaphysics: Speculations on Earths and Heavens (=GLST 27703). Social thought has recently reopened the subject matter of the "world": what is it made of, how does it hold together, who and what inhabits it? Proposals and inquiries generated in response are as imaginative as they are self-consciously urgent: written on the crest of the global ecological disaster, from within the zones of disturbance or the sites of extreme intervention into the living matter and forms of life, contemplating the end of the world and possibilities of extinction, redemption, cohabitation, or "collateral survival" (Tsing 2015). All are variously political. Foregrounding the plurality of the material worlds and lived worldviews on the one hand, and of the shared historical predicament on the other, social thinkers question universal values and conceivable relations, and search for alternate forms of grasping, engaging, and representing the pluriverse. This course goes along with such interests in the "worlds" and collects a number of compelling, contemporary texts that are variously oriented towards cosmopolitics, "minimalist metaphysics," "new materialisms," speculative realisms, eco-theology, and multispecies coexistence. Readings will stretch out to examine some classic ethnographic texts and past theoretical excursions into the perennial problem of how to know and tell the unfamiliar, native, worlds, which are swept by, mingling with, or standing out in the more globalizing trends of capitalist, scientific, and secular materialism. Larisa Jasarevic

25305.  Anthropology of Food and Cuisine.  (This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology Majors.) Contemporary human foodways are not only highly differentiated in cultural and social terms, but often have long and complicated histories. Anthropologists have long given attention to food – but up until quite recently, they have done so in an unsystematic, haphazard fashion. Food has figured prominently in theories of gift exchange, religious sacrifice, classificatory systems, the analysis of social structure and symbolic systems, but also political economy, cultural ecology, and applied work in famine-modeling, food security, and medical anthropology. More recently, food and eating have become the focus of an anthropology of the body, and have come to figure in attempts to theorize sensuality and the politics of pleasure and suffering. This course will explore several such themes with a view towards both the micro- and macro-politics of food by examining a range of ethnographic and historical case studies and theoretical texts. It takes the format of a seminar augmented by lectures (during the first few weeks), scheduled video screenings, and individual student presentations during the rest of the course. Stephan Palmié

25908/35908. Balkan Folklore (=CMLT 23301/33301, NEHC 20568/30568,  REES 29009/39009). Vampires, fire-breathing dragons, vengeful mountain nymphs. 7/8 and other uneven dance beats, heart-rending laments, and a living epic tradition. This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from historical, political, and anthropological perspectives. We seek to understand folk tradition as a dynamic process and consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition firsthand through visits of a Chicago-based folk dance ensemble, “Balkan Dance.”  Angelina Ilieva.

26711/36711. Ancient Landscapes-2 (GEOG 25800/35800, NEAA 200062/30062). (PQ ANTH 26710/36710).  This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI’s ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student. Staff

26765/36765. Arachaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions & World Heritage (=EALC 28010/48010). Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China. This course intends to examine the history of research, important archaeological finds, and the role of Anyang studies in the field of Chinese archaeology. While the emphasis is on archaeological finds and the related research, this course will also attempt to define Anyang in the modern social and cultural contexts in terms of world heritage, national and local identity, and the looting and illegal trade of antiquities. Yung-Ti Li.

28400/38800.  Bioarchaeology and the Human Skeleton (=BIOS 23247). This course is designed to provide students in archaeology with a thorough understanding of bioarchaeological and osteological methods used in the interpretation of prehistoric societies.  The integration of archaeology and human biology has been an especially dynamic part of anthropological endeavors during the past few decades, giving archaeologists important data on the genetic identity, health, and diet of ancient societies.  When combined with contextual data on mortuary treatment and cemetery structure, bioarchaeology forms a critical part of the technical arsenal of modern archaeologists.  The goal of this course will be to introduce students to bioarchaeological methods and theory.  In particular, laboratory instruction will stress hands-on experience in analyzing the human skeleton.  Seminar classes will emphasize bioanthropological theory and its application to specific cases throughout the world. There will be one laboratory class and one seminar-format class per week.  M.C. Lozada.  Tu 2:00-3:20; Thurs 12:30-1:50 or 2:00-3:20

29910.  BA Essay Seminar. (Limited to students writing BA papers in Anthropology. Consent of Instructor).  This course is designed to help anthropology undergraduates to develop, formulate, and write a promising research question that can be addressed in scholarly paper of 40 pages. To do this, we will develop a specialized set of writing skills, techniques, and strategies. First, we will address the problem of processing research “data”, focusing in particular on the relationship between questions and evidence. Second, we will engage with the writing-process proper, with a special focus on how to craft an argument of this length, including planning, outlining, and drafting. Third, we will explore the rhetorical qualities and characteristics of academic writing as a textual genre, with the goal of mastering the art of developing convincing argumentation. Ella Butler


Spring 2019

2009. Embodiment, Governance, Resistance, Ethics.  This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology Selection for Anthropology Majors)What does a study of the body teach us about governance and the experience of being governed? This course approaches bodies from three angles. First, bodies are targets of governance. They are objects to be reformed, regulated, contained, disciplined, educated, incarcerated, treated, trained, and "cared" for. Next, as bodies get targeted for reform, they are also converted into potent sites of resistance and critique. Certain bodies in certain places elicit discomfort, unsettling common ideals of private and public, of developed and backward, of religious and secular, and, with them, dominant understandings of modern citizenship. Finally, bodies in their sensory and affective capacities are also mobilized as resources for crafting belonging beyond the assigned terms of law or the state. Drawing from ethnographic texts and with special emphasis on Latin America, this course introduces students to the anthropology of embodiment as well as related themes of bio-politics, gender, intimacy, political subjectivity, care and self-making, post/colonialism, race, and aesthetics. In so doing, the hope is to generate new ways to make sense of matters near and far—from Lenin's body to Trump's hands, reproductive labor to sex work, dirty protest to women's marches, indigenous eco-rituals to queer intimacies. Mareike Winchell

20701-20702-20703. Introduction to African Civilization I, II, III. (=HIST 10101-10102-10103; CRES 20701-20802-20303; SOCI 20213,) Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Part Three of African Civilization examines the historical transformations of African societies in the long nineteenth century. At the beginning of this era, European economic and political presence was mainly along the coast, but by the end of this period nearly the entire continent was under formal colonial control. This course examines how and why this transformation occurred, highlighting the struggles that African societies faced managing internal reforms and external political, military, and economic pressures. Topics covered include the Egyptian conquest of Sudan, Omani colonialism on the Swahili Coast, and Islamic reform movements, as well as connections between the end of the transatlantic slave trade and the formal colonization of the African continent. Katie Hickerson

21306/45301. Explorations in Oral Narrative.  (This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology Selection for Anthropology Majors). A study of storytelling in non-literate and folk societies, antecedent to the complexities of modern narrativity, itself anchored in and energized by literacy. Despite the impact of literacy on modern minds this course argues for the persistence of ancient themes, plots, characters and motifs.. A further argument is made for the foundational role of storytelling in the creation of culture and construction of society. The central place of storytelling is shown in the humanistic and social sciences:  anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychoanalysis. Student  storytelling and performance of brief stories is encouraged and discussed  in light of the main arguments of the course.  James Fernandez

21341. Making Plants Work: Anthropology of Human-Plant Relationships.  Food, drink, fuel, pharmaceuticals, clothing, cosmetics, construction material, furniture… Plants and their byproducts are everywhere we look. How have plants become so ubiquitous to human life? How have plants been used, adapted, processed, and sold over the course of history? How can studying plants and their interactions with humans provide a different perspective on the past, and insight into the future? This course explores how humans have made plants “work,” and how these working plants have, in turn, shaped the world in which we live. While often perceived as passive in comparison to human and animal counterparts, plants have played a critical role in shaping global social, economic, ecological, and political dynamics. As desired products, plants have entangled far-flung individuals and societies into complex relationships that reverberate across time and space. This course will survey the history of human-plant interactions through three units: domestication, colonialism, and modern technologies. We will examine a wide range of case studies, in an effort to gain  comparative and multivocal understanding of human-plant relationships. In doing so, course materials touch on topics of general anthropological interest: political ecology, agency, social inequality, labor, global processes, the impacts of colonialism, the production of knowledge, and human/non-human relationships. Johanna Pacyga

21342.  Welcome to the Good Life: The Black Edition (=CRES 21342).  What do we mean when we say “the good life”? In the United States, the good life has long been synonymous with the idea of the American dream (the white picket fence, secure union job, stable marriage with 2.5 kids). But over the past several years, this romanticized image has increasingly been thrown into crisis with the rise of a destabilized national economy, political infighting, and in the aftermath of the housing collapse. It seems as though the veil has been lifted and the American Dream has been exposed as a fantasy object, if not a complete impossibility. But for people of color, and black people in particular who have been historically disenfranchised and thus unable to access the housing, education, and medical resources necessary to make the American dream a reality, this fantasy has always already been understood as such. Indeed, black experiences reveal how whiteness as a structural mechanism stands at the foundation of the American Dream.

This class explores how black people have imagined, worked toward, and critiqued the idea of the good life. We will analyze music, films, novels, and academic texts to explore how black people have simultaneously desired the good life yet remained aware of how their racial blackness is and has been a barrier to it. We will also take up materials that disavow the good life altogether, validating and valorizing the difficult life experiences that are indelibly black as the only life, good or otherwise, worth living. As we explore the ways that black people have shaped and reshaped concepts of the good life, we gain rich insight into the ways that fantasy and imagination are the very grounds upon which notions of belonging, community and citizenship are defined and debated. Emily Bock

21420.  Ethnographic Methods: (PQ: Preference given to third-year Anthropology majors preparing to write BA papers next year.)  This is a course on how to do ethnographic research. While recent decades have seen scholars rightfully insist on the artistic and inherently personal quality of ‘doing’ and ‘writing’ ethnography, the course aims to illuminate the regulating structures of thought and practice underpinning every piece of original ethnographic work. The course is both a reading and a research workshop. As a reading workshop, it seeks to enable students to read ethnography like ethnographers: identifying and learning from the inner workings of the research project at the heart of each ethnographic text. As a research workshop, the course progressively leads students to construct and implement a research project of their own. Students will methodically enact the physical techniques and analytic practices emerging from their reading of ethnography.

Throughout the course, we will grapple with the challenges facing an ethnographic researcher, and identify the building blocks of an ethnographic project. In this effort, we will focus on the posing of a research question; the formulation of conceptual frameworks; constructing a statement of problem; actors and informants; the semiotics and pragmatics of interviewing; analysis of interactions qua participant-observer, and historical approaches in ethnography. Students will also experiment with forms of non-verbal visual representation.  Inés Escobar González

21428/38600.  Apes and Human Evolution (=BIOS 13253,HIPS 21428). (This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology Selection) A critical examination of the ways in which data on the behavior, morphology and genetics of apes have been used to elucidate human evolution, with particular emphasis on bipedalism, hunting, meat-eating, tool behavior, food sharing, cognitive ability, language, self-awareness, and sociability. Visits to local zoos, films, and demonstrations with casts of fossils and skeletons. Russell Tuttle. MW 9:30-10:20, F 9:30-11:20

22170.Taste and Technoscience (=GLST 24112). This course examines the politics of food in the age of mass production, taking the sensory dimension of food as its orienting lens.  From artificial flavors to molecular gastronomy, the 20th Century has been marked by technological innovations in our food.  These changes have not only transformed what we eat but also how our food is made and how we think about what it does to our bodies, shifting the meaning of ideas about what constitutes “taste,” “flavor,” and even “food” itself.  We will discuss what role scientific expertise has played in shaping how taste is produced as an intimate bodily experience.  On the one hand, we will read historical and ethnographic accounts of the work of technoscientific professionals responsible for the design, analysis and production of the tastes and flavors of foods.  Rarely rising to the level of explicit marketing, the scientific design of tastes and flavors forms the invisible infrastructure behind the dependable, even pleasurable, routines of everyday life: from the satisfying crunch of morning cereal to the indulgent sweet midnight snack.  We will read social scientific literature examining the sites and methods for making and measuring the taste, flavor, texture and smell of food.  We will situate ethnographic and historical readings within broader cultural discussions about the role and form of mass commodity production in contemporary life, the social life of chemicals, and the history and anthropology of the senses. Taste provides an avenue through which to examine how the politics of science and technology intersect with capitalism and commodities alongside our own, everyday pleasures and anxieties as we make the quotidian and unremitting decision of “what to eat.” Ella Butler

23026/31640. Science in the South: Decolonizing the Study of Knowledge in Latin America and the Caribbean (=LACS 24706, HIPS 24706). This seminar will bridge anthropologies and histories of science, technology, and medicine to Latin American decolonial thought. Throughout Latin America, techno-scientific objects and practices, with their presumed origin in the Euro-Atlantic North, are often complexly entangled with neo-imperial projects of development and modernization that elongate social forms of colonization into the present. Technoscience and its objects, however, can also generate new creative, political, and life-enhancing potentials beyond or despite their colonial resonances, or even provide tools to ongoing struggles for decolonization. Together, seminar participants will explore what a decolonial approach to the study of science, technology, and medicine in the Global South, particularly in Latin America, has been and could become and how decolonial theory can inflect our own disciplinary, conceptual, and political commitments as anthropologists of technoscience. Stefanie Graeter

23101-23102-23103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I, II, III. (=HIST 16101-16102-16103, LTAM 16100-16200-16300, LCAS 34600-34700-34800, SOSC 26100-26200-26300) PQ: May be taken in sequence or individually. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central America, South America, Caribbean Islands).  Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec.  The quarter concludes with consideration of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.  Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.  Spring Quarterfocuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region. Bodwyn Fischer. MWF 1:30-2:20

23700/33700. Capitalism, Colonialism and Nationalism in the Pacific.  (This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology Majors.) This course compares colonial capitalist projects and their dialogic transfor­mations up to present political dilemmas, with special attention to Fiji, New Zealand, and Hawai’i, and a focus on the labor diaspora, the fates of indigenous polities, and tensions in contemporary citizenship. We will compare Wakefield’s “scientific colonization” in New Zealand, Gordon’s social experiments and indentured labor in Fiji, and the plantations, American annexation, tourism and the military in Hawai’i.  We will compare the colonial experiences of the Maori, Hawaiians and indigenous Fijians, and also those of the immigrant laborers and their descendants, especially white New Zealanders, the South Asians in Fiji and the Japanese in Hawai’i.  General pro­positions about nationalism, capitalism “late” and otherwise,  global cultural flows, and postcolonial subject positions will be juxtaposed with contemporary Pacific conflicts. John Kelly.

24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I, II, III. (=CRPC 24001-24002-24003, HIST 18301-18302-18303, SOSC 24001-24002-24003). PQ: These courses must be taken in sequence.  This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.  This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange.  We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.  Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.  Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.  The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.  Alice Yao (II), Sean Brotherton (III)

24316. Thinking Psychoanalytically: From the Sciences to the Arts (=BPRO 28400). Since Freud's seminal investigation into the nature of the mind, psychoanalytic thinking has offered a unique approach to unconscious, relational, and meaningful dimensions of human experience. Despite assaults on the field from numerous quarters, psychoanalytic thinking remains central to the work of practitioners across an array of disciplines. After an introduction to key psychoanalytic concepts, including the unconscious, repression, and transference, we will investigate some of the ways in which these ideas are mobilized within clinical practice, neuroscience, anthropology, education, philosophy, literary studies, and the visual arts through a series of lectures presented by specialists from these fields. Along the way, we will gain an appreciation for some of the ways in which psychoanalytic perspectives continue to inspire a variety of current scientific and humanistic projects. E. Anne Beal

24331. Medical Anthropology. The meanings of health and illness are often taken for granted. However, our ideas about and experiences of bodies, wellness, disease, healing, and medicine are profoundly shaped by culture, as well as by histories of colonialism, structural inequalities, the development of new technologies, and the transnational flows of people, ideas, and resources. An informed understanding of health and illness must begin by exploring the multiple contexts—cultural, geopolitical, and socio-economic—from which experiences of health and bodily disarray are generated. In this class, students will be taught to think in cross-cultural and global terms. We will work comparatively to illuminate different systems for understanding and intervening into embodied problems. Although Western biomedicine has developed powerful theories and practices to treat all bodies in universal terms, medical anthropology continually points to the differences in how bodies "count": who thrives, who falls ill and from what causes, and who has access (or not) to relevant expert healing resources are matters not only of biological vulnerability, but of culture and power. This course provides an overview of the intersection where health, culture, and political-economic power meet. Through course readings, discussions, active learning exercises, and writing assignments, students will not only consider intellectually challenging materials on cross-cultural experiences of health and disease, but interrogate their own personal and social beliefs about bodies and their vulnerabilities.  Andrea Ford

24355/35135. Experiencing Madness: Empathic Methods in Cultural Psychiatry (=CHDV 32822, HIPS 22800/CHSS 32800, MAPS 32800). This course provides students with an introduction to the phenomenological approach in cultural psychiatry, focusing on the problem of "how to represent mental illness" as a thematic anchor. Students will examine the theoretical and methodological groundings of cultural psychiatry, examining how scholars working in the phenomenological tradition have tried to describe the lived experiences of various forms of "psychopathology" or "madness." By the end of the course, students will have learned how to describe and analyze the social dimension of a mental health experience, using a phenomenologically-grounded anthropological approach, and by adopting a technical vocabulary for understanding the lived experiences of mental illness (for instance, phenomena, life-world, being-in-the-world, intentionality, epoché, embodiment, madness, psychopathology, melancholia/depression, schizophrenia, etc). In addition, given the ongoing problematic of "how to represent mental illness," students will also have the opportunity to think through the different ways of presenting their analysis, both in the form of weekly blog entries and during a final-week mock-workshop, where they will showcase their work in a creative medium appropriate to that analysis. Francis Mckay.

24810.  Atmospherics. In a world of changing climate, how do we change the political? What affective chemistry is needed to recognize and mobilize on behalf of shifting air currents? This seminar explores the conceptual and material chemistries of atmosphere. The course will investigate key texts on climate change, embodiment, and affect, as well as recent ethnographic explorations of environmental sensibilities across air, ice, ocean, and land. Joseph Masco

25150/35150. Anthropology of Israel (=MAPS 36567, CMES 35150, NEHC 25147/35147, JWSC 25149). This seminar explores the dynamics of Israeli culture and society through a   combination of weekly screenings of Israeli fiction and documentary films with readings from ethnographic and other relevant research. Among the (often overlapping) topics to be covered in this examination of the institutional and ideological construction of Israeli identity/ies: the absorption of immigrants; ethnic, class, and religious tensions; the kibbutz; military experience; the Holocaust; evolving attitudes about gender and sexuality; the struggle for minorities’ rights; and Arab-Jewish relations.  Morris Fred. Tues 3:30-6:20

25411.  California: Utopia/Dystopia.   California is a bellwether for the nation, and the site of both utopian and dystopian imaginaries. From Silicon Valley’s reinvention of the world through technology, to Hollywood’s national storytelling through film, from Disney’s fantasyland to San Francisco’s communes to Los Angeles' metropolis, California is a lightening rod for various visions of the future. It epitomizes the “frontier” where traditions hold less sway, especially for women and LGBTQ people. It is the paradigmatic site of both national immigration stereotypes: the high-skilled Asian tech worker and low-skilled Latino agricultural laborer; yet its current leading role in opposition to federal immigration policy should be considered alongside its legalized sinophobia in the late 19th century and Japanese internment in the mid 20th. Both reactionary and progressive when confronted with social change, it previews debates that later happen on a national stage. Starting with the Gold Rush, which epitomized an American Dream of wealth for the taking and brought with it a brutal genocide of Native Californians, California has been an exaggeration of American ideals and disgraces. It hosts extremes of poverty and wealth, urban and rural, liberalism and conservatism (Reagan was, after all, Californian). The sustainability cult of the Bay Area exists alongside the most polluted places in the country, from silicon waste in Santa Clara to agricultural runoff and abysmal air quality in the Central Valley. In this course, we will consider California (both the ideal and the real) through ethnography, history, literature, sociology, and theory, and include film, photography, and other arts. How do ideas about a place, and the lived reality of a place, mutually shape each other? What is the role of utopian/dystopian thinking in the national imagination? A major premise of the course is that utopia for some is dystopia for others — whose visions count, and in what ways?  Andrea Ford

25905. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia (=NEHC 20764/30765, MUSI 23503/33503, REES 25001/35001).  This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition, the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area. Kagan Arik.

26760/46760. Archaeology of Bronze Age China (=EALC 28015/48015).  “Bronze Age" in China conventionally refers to the time period from ca. 2000 BC to about 500 BC, during which bronze, an alloy of copper and other metals such as tin and lead, was the predominant medium used by the society, or to be more precise, the elite classes of the society. Bronze objects, in the forms of vessels, weapons, and musical instruments, were reserved for the upper ruling class of the society and were used mostly as paraphernalia during rituals and feasting. "Bronze Age" in China also indicates the emergence and eventual maturation of states with their bureaucratic systems, the presence of urban centers, a sophisticated writing system, and advanced craft producing industries, especially metal production. This course surveys the important archaeological finds of Bronze Age China and the theoretical issues such as state formation, craft production, writing, bureaucratic systems, urbanization, warfare, and inter-regional interaction, etc. It emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach with readings and examples from anthropology, archaeology, art history, and epigraphy. This course will also visit the Smart Museum, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago to take advantage of the local collections of ancient Chinese arts and archaeology. Yung-Ti Li

27430. Linguistic Politics: Language Revitalization (=LING 27430).  (This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology course for Anthropology Majors.) Linguists and the general public have long been alarmed about the number of languages that disappear from use, and so are no longer spoken in the world. Their speakers shift to other languages. As part of the response, social groups have been mobilizing for many decades to prevent such lapses/losses and shifts in use and to document, revitalize, archive and mobilize the resources of communication. This course takes up the processes by which shift happens, asking what "language" is in these transformations; what and how linguistic forms, cultural values, and social institutions are involved and what social activism can or cannot accomplish in the "saving" of languages. Susan Gal

29601.  Populism and Its Discontents (=PLSC, HIST, CHDV etc) (PQ  3rd or 4th year standing. This is a 3CT Capstone Course.)  Populism and its Discontents is a reading-based undergraduate discussion seminar. Populism is currently the word on everyone's lips. But what does it mean? We begin with the ambiguous status of populism in current public debates; populism is at once imagined as the lifeblood of genuine democracy and at the same time as the dark force that threatens democracy from within. Why should this be? Questions to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: Are there progressive and regressive forms of populism? Does populism look different in today's social media-saturated world than it did a hundred years ago? Does populism in the Global South force us to reconsider what we think we know about its Euro-American variants? Students will be asked to complete assignments drawing on the assigned readings and audiovisual materials and on contemporary media sources. William Mazzarella