Dreaming at the Threshold of the Law: Psychoanalysis, Aesthetics, and an Islamic Liturgy of Healing

Research interests: Cultural Anthropology, theories of subjectivity, postcolonial criticism, anthropology and literature, Islam, Middle East and the Maghreb

Read the full post


Hearing the Name

Bio: 
Carlo's work explores global health at the intersection of science, medicine, media and the state. His first book, The Pandemic Perhaps, shows how pandemic influenza became a global threat. Articles on biomedicine, bioscience and biosecurity have appeared in journals such as Cultural Anthropology, Current Anthropology, Critical Inquiry, BioSocieties, Annual Review of Anthropology, Cambridge Anthropology and Anthropological Theory. He is the co-editor of a Current Anthropology special issue on new media.

Read the full post


’Monumental Corruption’: Uncanny Virtues in a Time of Routine Crisis

Bio: Sarah Muir (Ph.D., University of Chicago 2011) examines the practical logics of economic investment, ethical evaluation, and political critique, with a particular focus on social class and financial crisis. Situated at the intersection of semiotic, political-economic, and historical anthropology, her research is grounded in ethnographic fieldwork and archival research in Argentina.

Read the full post


The Political Economy of the Enchanted Universe

Marshall Sahlins is presently doing research focused on the intersection of culture and history, especially as those play out in early-modern Pacific societies. He recently published a book of his anthropological and political essays ranging from the 60s through the 90s, and is working on two others: a set of studies in history and historiography and a multi-volume work on “The Polynesian War,” a history of the great Fijian War, 1843-1855. From time to time he drops these ethnographic particularities for high-flying cultural theory. (Retired June 1997; still teaching.)

Read the full post


The Collapse of the World: In DeafBlind communities in the US

Research Interests: Edwards’ research is concerned with the many ways that language reflects and is shaped by our experiences in the world. For the past 10 years, she has been pursuing this interest in DeafBlind communities in the United States, where a new, tactile language is emerging. She has published articles on language emergence, re-channeling language, sign-creation, and intention-attribution, and is currently writing a book about language and life in DeafBlind communities titled, “Going Tactile: Life at the Limits of Language.”

Read the full post