Graduate Courses — Winter 2010

37201. Language in Culture I (LING 3110, Psych 47001). Must be taken in sequence. This is a two-quarter sequence to introduce some of the central theoretical issues involved in the semiotic, cognitive and sociopolitical study of language in its contexts of communicative use. By developing and using semiotic concepts, the first quarter concentrates on two major problems that organize a vast literature and diverse theoretical approaches. The first problem is to understand interpersonal communication is carried on in-and-by the medium of language.   Such communication manifests itself both in an orderly, or at least ˜(non-in)coherent unfolding of information and in the structured and culturally consequential social action that is accomplished in-and-by that unfolding. The second problem is to understand how language is a medium of and factor in so-called ˜conceptual representations or mental knowledge. There are various sources of such knowledge ˜coded in the forms of language, and this diversity reveals the modes of semiosis of which language is composed at its various planes. We concentrate in particular on the semiotic characterization of dialectially emergent cultural knowledge or cultural conceptualization, the nature of which is a current research frontier between social and cognitive sciences, between modernist and post-modernist humanities. Michael Silverstein. WedFri 9:30-11:20

45405. Maverick Markets: Cultural Economy and Cultural Finance (SOCI 40172).What are the cultural dimensions of economic and financial institutions and financial action? What social variables influence and shape 'real' markets and market activities? 'If you are so smart, why aren't you rich?' is a question economists have been asked in the past. Why isnt it easy to make money in financial areas even if one knows what economists know about markets, finance and the economy? And why, on the other hand, is it so easy to get rich for some participants? Perhaps the answer is that real markets are complex social and cultural institutions which are quite different from organizations, administrations and the production side of the economy. The course addresses these differences and core dimensions of economic sociology; it is not focused on the sociology of organizations. K. Knorr Cetina. Mon 12:30-3:20 pm

45600. When Cultures Collide (=CHDV 45600, HMRT 35600, PSYC 45300, GNDR 45600, CRPC 45600). Coming to terms with diversity in an increasingly multicultural world has become one of the most pressing public policy projects for liberal democracies in the early 21st century.   One way to come to terms with diversity is to try to understand the scope and limits of toleration for variety at different national sites where immigration from foreign lands has complicated the cultural landscape.   This seminar  examines a series of legal and moral questions about the proper response to norm conflict between mainstream populations and cultural minority groups (including old and new immigrants), with special reference to court cases that have arisen in the recent history of the United States. R. Shweder. Wed 9:30-11:50

50500. Commodity Aesthetics: Critical Encounters. Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adornos classic writings on the relationship between cultural production, capitalism and aesthetic experience, value and embodiment are back on the anthropological agenda. Why should this be the case? What relevance does the cultural critique of the Frankfurt School hold for contemporary ethnographic projects? Although this seminar in a sense hinges on the work of Benjamin and Adorno, it is above all an attempt to locate the questions they asked in relation to a longer philosophical genealogy: broadly, German critical responses to capitalist modernity and its particular claims on the senses. Readings will include excerpts from key texts by Kant, Hegel, Marx, Lukacs, Weber, Simmel, Balasz, Kracauer, Adorno, and Benjamin. William Mazzarella. Wed 12:00 Noon-2:50 pm [NOT 11:30 am “ 2:20 pm]

50600. Reading Foucault.  This course consists of close readings of Foucaults pivotal works. We will examine his engagement with and development of concepts that include knowledge & power, discipline, governmentality, and biopolitics. Special attention will be given to Foucaults analytic reliance on relationality, such as his focus on the infinite potential in social connection and communication. This course is ideal for students new to Foucault and for those wanting to revisit his seminal works in an intensive group setting. K. Fikes. Tues 1:30-4:20

52810. Stigma.  This course explores analyses of "abnormality" in anthropology and in the social sciences.  As ideals of accountability and fault shift from institutions to selves, research questions pertaining to difference and abnormality likewise change, as the lives and activities of the persons we study reflect the impact of the shift in question.  The inter-subjective tensions that Goffman emphasized, on the individual management of "spoiled identity," likewise shifts, as what was once "personal" is rendered "public" through liberal ideology.  In this course we will explore the neo-liberal/post-industrial terrain in which identity politics are rationalized. K. Fikes. Thurs, 1:30-4:20.

56305. Time and Temporality. How is time understood, experienced, and represented by different human societies? How are we to understand the social significance of ruins, heirlooms, origin stories, science fiction and millenarianism? How can we (re)construct past times? How do imagined futures structure practice? Does modernity represent a rent in the fabric of human time, as it so often claims? How do temporalities affect our research? We will explore these and other questions through a reading of philosophical, anthropological, and archaeological texts on time and temporality, drawing on sources as disperse as Heraclitus, Marx, Benjamin, Munn, Bradley, Koselleck, Gell, and Dietler. While the course may be of special interest to archaeologists and will emphasize how time is spatialized and materialized, the discussion and readings will be broad and interdisciplinary. S. Dawdy. Thurs . 9:00-11:50 am.Graduate Courses

37201. Language in Culture I (LING 3110, Psych 47001). Must be taken in sequence. This is a two-quarter sequence to introduce some of the central theoretical issues involved in the semiotic, cognitive and sociopolitical study of language in its contexts of communicative use. By developing and using semiotic concepts, the first quarter concentrates on two major problems that organize a vast literature and diverse theoretical approaches. The first problem is to understand interpersonal communication is carried on in-and-by the medium of language.   Such communication manifests itself both in an orderly, or at least ˜(non-in)coherent unfolding of information and in the structured and culturally consequential social action that is accomplished in-and-by that unfolding. The second problem is to understand how language is a medium of and factor in so-called ˜conceptual representations or mental knowledge. There are various sources of such knowledge ˜coded in the forms of language, and this diversity reveals the modes of semiosis of which language is composed at its various planes. We concentrate in particular on the semiotic characterization of dialectially emergent cultural knowledge or cultural conceptualization, the nature of which is a current research frontier between social and cognitive sciences, between modernist and post-modernist humanities. Michael Silverstein. WedFri 9:30-11:20

45405. Maverick Markets: Cultural Economy and Cultural Finance (SOCI 40172).What are the cultural dimensions of economic and financial institutions and financial action? What social variables influence and shape 'real' markets and market activities? 'If you are so smart, why aren't you rich?' is a question economists have been asked in the past. Why isnt it easy to make money in financial areas even if one knows what economists know about markets, finance and the economy? And why, on the other hand, is it so easy to get rich for some participants? Perhaps the answer is that real markets are complex social and cultural institutions which are quite different from organizations, administrations and the production side of the economy. The course addresses these differences and core dimensions of economic sociology; it is not focused on the sociology of organizations. K. Knorr Cetina. Mon 12:30-3:20 pm

45600. When Cultures Collide (=CHDV 45600, HMRT 35600, PSYC 45300, GNDR 45600, CRPC 45600). Coming to terms with diversity in an increasingly multicultural world has become one of the most pressing public policy projects for liberal democracies in the early 21st century.   One way to come to terms with diversity is to try to understand the scope and limits of toleration for variety at different national sites where immigration from foreign lands has complicated the cultural landscape.   This seminar  examines a series of legal and moral questions about the proper response to norm conflict between mainstream populations and cultural minority groups (including old and new immigrants), with special reference to court cases that have arisen in the recent history of the United States. R. Shweder. Wed 9:30-11:50

50500. Commodity Aesthetics: Critical Encounters. Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adornos classic writings on the relationship between cultural production, capitalism and aesthetic experience, value and embodiment are back on the anthropological agenda. Why should this be the case? What relevance does the cultural critique of the Frankfurt School hold for contemporary ethnographic projects? Although this seminar in a sense hinges on the work of Benjamin and Adorno, it is above all an attempt to locate the questions they asked in relation to a longer philosophical genealogy: broadly, German critical responses to capitalist modernity and its particular claims on the senses. Readings will include excerpts from key texts by Kant, Hegel, Marx, Lukacs, Weber, Simmel, Balasz, Kracauer, Adorno, and Benjamin. William Mazzarella. Wed 12:00 Noon-2:50 pm [NOT 11:30 am “ 2:20 pm]

50600. Reading Foucault.  This course consists of close readings of Foucaults pivotal works. We will examine his engagement with and development of concepts that include knowledge & power, discipline, governmentality, and biopolitics. Special attention will be given to Foucaults analytic reliance on relationality, such as his focus on the infinite potential in social connection and communication. This course is ideal for students new to Foucault and for those wanting to revisit his seminal works in an intensive group setting. K. Fikes. Tues 1:30-4:20

52810. Stigma.  This course explores analyses of "abnormality" in anthropology and in the social sciences.  As ideals of accountability and fault shift from institutions to selves, research questions pertaining to difference and abnormality likewise change, as the lives and activities of the persons we study reflect the impact of the shift in question.  The inter-subjective tensions that Goffman emphasized, on the individual management of "spoiled identity," likewise shifts, as what was once "personal" is rendered "public" through liberal ideology.  In this course we will explore the neo-liberal/post-industrial terrain in which identity politics are rationalized. K. Fikes. Thurs, 1:30-4:20.

56305. Time and Temporality. How is time understood, experienced, and represented by different human societies? How are we to understand the social significance of ruins, heirlooms, origin stories, science fiction and millenarianism? How can we (re)construct past times? How do imagined futures structure practice? Does modernity represent a rent in the fabric of human time, as it so often claims? How do temporalities affect our research? We will explore these and other questions through a reading of philosophical, anthropological, and archaeological texts on time and temporality, drawing on sources as disperse as Heraclitus, Marx, Benjamin, Munn, Bradley, Koselleck, Gell, and Dietler. While the course may be of special interest to archaeologists and will emphasize how time is spatialized and materialized, the discussion and readings will be broad and interdisciplinary. S. Dawdy. Thurs . 9:00-11:50 am.